|   | 
 
Top of left column

News & Features

Join us! link

 

 
September 2014
Small Changes with Impact: The Third Chair in Triage™
Sep 10, 2014 1:17 PM

Small changes can improve the experiences that patients and families have with healthcare. We have been talking about things like hospital parking and food as areas that are relatively non-controversial but have room for clear and concrete changes that would significantly impact our experiences as patients or family members. We’ve developed these ideas to act as Key Performance Targets (KPTs) that can be used by healthcare organizations and bodies to help improve their care.

These KPTs were identified by listening to patient experiences for many years and discussing them with a panel of patients, family members, providers and researchers to determine how these experiences could be improved. We’re now excited to announce Patients Canada’s Small Changes with Impact initiative – a set of Key Performance Targets for healthcare, informed by patient and family member experiences with the system.

The first of these ideas sets the tone for what we are doing; it is a small change that has not so far occurred to service providers, has only been implemented in hospitals with a well-developed patient voice, and can be seen as a challenge for change in hospitals that have not yet implemented it.

Over the last few years, we have heard hundreds of stories from patients and families who have visited emergency rooms. From them, we learned that most emergency rooms have two seats in the triage office – one for the patient and one for the triage nurse. Over time, it became obvious that a third chair for a family member would be a tremendous help not only for the patient and the accompanying person (often a family member), but also for the triage nurse who could gain that extra insight when making the decision about what to do next.

The Third Chair in Triage™ is our first Key Performance Target. We have been told by the CEO of the Kingston General Hospital, Leslee Thompson, that the third chair has already been installed in their hospital emergency room. Obviously, their Patient and Family Experience Advisors came to the same conclusion that we did.

Our challenge is not only to hospitals, but also to researchers in emergency medicine, regulatory bodies, accreditation groups and others to respond to this minimal intervention. The hospitals can add the chair and researchers can evaluate the impact. After that, regulatory agencies might adopt it as a requirement for accrediting emergency facilities. We believe that this would be an important step forward in making healthcare services more patient-friendly. What do you think?

Next week we will present more key performance targets.

ALL, Patient-centred measures  


  


 

Follow us on Twitter
Become a Fan on Facebook

what is a patient?

Patient stories

what is a patient?

patients canada in the news

Patients Canada brochure PDF